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Notes: Glaus out for the season
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08/20/2003  7:55 PM ET 
Notes: Glaus out for the season
Third baseman to begin six weeks of physical therapy
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CHICAGO -- In an announcement that didn't come as a surprise to anyone in the Angels clubhouse, third baseman Troy Glaus is out for the season because of a partial tear in his right rotator cuff and fraying in his labrum.

Glaus hasn't played since July 21, when he left a game at Tampa Bay early because he fell awkwardly on the shoulder.

    Troy Glaus   /   3B
Height: 6'5"
Weight: 229
Bats/Throws: R/R

More info:
Player page
Stats
Hit chart
Angels site

On Tuesday, Glaus underwent a second examination on the shoulder with Dr. James Andrews at the Alabama Sports Medicine and Orthopedic Center in Birmingham, Alabama. The test confirmed Angels team doctor Lewis Yocum's original diagnosis.

Both doctors have prescribed six weeks of physical therapy and re-evaluation following that time period, so Glaus will not play again this year. He finished the season with a .248 batting average, 16 home runs and 50 RBIs in 91 games.

"I know Troy's frustrated, but the fact that it's six weeks and there's finally a definitive time frame, and that he doesn't have to worry about this season because this is the course of action to take, that will be a weight off his back," Angels manager Mike Scioscia said.

Scioscia said surgery was still a possibility, albeit a "last resort," if Glaus' shoulder doesn't respond positively to the treatment, but in either case the manager expects Glaus to be ready for Spring Training.

"I don't know if you ever rule (surgery) out, but if they thought it was needed right now, they would have done it now," Scioscia said.

Given the fact that it took the Angels about a month to admit Glaus won't play anymore, questions naturally turned to the subject of center fielder Darin Erstad, who has battled rather unsuccessfully against right hamstring tendinitis all season.

Erstad missed 42 games early in the season because of the condition, came back to the lineup June 9, and watched his batting average plummet 60 points before going back on the DL on Aug. 9 because of a flareup of the injury. He never ran at full speed and wore a huge knee brace to prevent hyperextension.

Scioscia wouldn't come out and say that Erstad is out for the year, but he offered one of his strongest hints that this would be the case.

"Obviously, as more time goes on, the likelihood of returning diminishes," Scioscia said. "But it doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure that out. Right now, he's not at the point of being close to coming back. You just have to take it slow."

With only 35 games left in the season, it's likely that Erstad will join Glaus in simply hoping to be ready for mid-February in Tempe, Ariz.

While devastating injuries like this and their ramifications in the standings -- the Angels entered Wednesday night's game only one game ahead of last-place Texas in the American League West -- could cause frustration and in-fighting, veteran Troy Percival hasn't seen that in this year's club.

"We get a long and we still play hard," Percival said. "Other teams are just playing better than us. There was a lot of finger-pointing in other years, but not now. Guys are going out and trying to win every game."

G'day, Trent: Utility man Trent Durrington arrived in Chicago to join the Angels for his third-career big-league stint a day after shortstop David Eckstein was placed on the 15-day DL with inflammation in his right hamstring.

Durrington, a 27-year-old native of Australia who can play all the infield positions, the corner outfield spots and "some emergency catcher," according to Scioscia, is more known for his authentic accent and fiery field demeanor than his talent, although he was hitting .307 with 35 stolen bases in Triple-A Salt Lake this season.

Durrington has a lifetime Major League batting average of .176 in 47 games over the 1999 and 2000 seasons.

"It's been a long road, but it's a good time playing a sport for a living," Durrington said. "I always felt I had the tools. As far as this year, I didn't worry about what was going to happen. I kept my mind on my business and here I am."

Bittner dealing: Left-handed pitcher Tim Bittner, who was the last throw-in to complete the deal that sent Scott Schoeneweis to the White Sox for Gary Glover, has been almost unhittable for Single-A Rancho Cucamonga.

Bittner, 23, has not given up an earned run in 20 2/3 innings for the Quakes, including a win Tuesday night that upped his record to 3-0. Bittner went six shutout innings, allowing four hits and two walks with six strikeouts. He has struck out 21 batters this season while walking 10.

The other pitcher the Angels got in the deal, right-hander Scott Dunn, is 1-0 for Double-A Arkansas. He has pitched five shutout innings of relief, striking out seven.

Coming up: The Angels leave Chicago and head to Detroit for a four-game series at Comerica Park against the Tigers that begins Thursday night. Aaron Sele (6-9, 5.22 ERA) takes the hill for Anaheim against Detroit right-hander Shane Loux (0-0, 7.20) in the 5:05 p.m. PT start.

Doug Miller is a reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to approval by Major League Baseball or its clubs.



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