LOS ANGELES -- The Padres signed 40 of the 44 players they picked in June's First-Year Player Draft, with the last player they selected actually being the last one they signed.

On Friday, the deadline to sign players from this Draft, the Padres agreed to terms with pitcher Terrance Owens from the University of Toledo. Owens doesn't actually play baseball at Toledo but, instead, is an athletic quarterback with limited baseball experience.

"We took a guy who is a long shot ... but he's a long shot worth taking," said Chad MacDonald, who is the Padres' assistant general manager of player personnel.

MacDonald said Owens' commitment now is to football, and he's part of the competition to become the Rockets' starting quarterback. Owens wouldn't start his professional baseball career until 2013 at the earliest.

The Padres control his rights for the next 6 1/2 years, meaning that if or when Owens decides to give baseball his full attention, he'll continue to be a member of the organization.

MacDonald joked Friday that he and members of the organization might head to Tucson on Sept. 1 as Owens' Rockets take on the University of Arizona in a non-conference game.

The Padres signed 21 of their top 22 Draft picks, including their first-round pick, left-handed pitcher Max Fried, who was the seventh overall selection.

The only players the Padres didn't sign were right-handed pitcher Andrew Sopko (14th round), right-handed pitcher Kevin McCanna (22nd round), outfielder Jacob Robson (30th) and infielder Mac Seibert (36th).

"We're very happy that our scouting staff, led by Jaron Madison, got us the guys we wanted and knew their signability," MacDonald said. "We evaluated them the right way and now they're out playing and we're looking forward to letting them progress."

Wieland nears decision on possible elbow surgery

LOS ANGELES -- Pitcher Joe Wieland, on the disabled list since May 7 because of a strained right elbow, is close to knowing if the injury will require season-ending surgery or if he'll continue his rehabilitation.

Wieland spoke with team doctor Heinz Hoenecke on Friday and said that he will meet with members of the front office and, likely, trainer Todd Hutcheson on Monday when the team returns to San Diego. At that point, a decision will be made on the elbow.

"We're still kind of figuring it out," Wieland said.

One thing is certain, though: Wieland is beyond frustrated with the injury.

Wieland said he was making inroads to returning to the mound during the first week of the month when he felt a pop in his elbow after throwing a curveball at the team's Spring Training facility in Arizona.

"It was one pitch," Wieland said Friday. "It popped and I felt it. It was around the 26th or 27th pitch of my second bullpen [session]. It was like nothing I have felt before. Everything was great up until that point."

Wieland, who is one of seven starting pitchers on the DL, was 0-4 with a 4.55 ERA in five starts before the injury. He was initially placed on the 15-day DL and was later moved to the 60-day DL.

Street spreads wealth with All-Star souvenirs

LOS ANGELES -- As it turns out, Padres closer Huston Street brought back more than just memories from his first All-Star Game experience earlier this week.

Street brought home a lot more luggage than he carried to Kansas City, as he loaded up on souvenirs for his friends, family and teammates before flying back to San Diego on Wednesday.

"I bought everything ... hats, shirts, fleeces and extra jerseys for friends who might want them," Street said on Friday before the Padres opened a three-game series at Dodger Stadium.

"But that's what it's about -- sharing."

Street, who didn't appear in the All-Star Game on Tuesday, joked that he might have blown his All-Star Game award bonus of $25,000 that's included in the contract extension he signed with the Rockies in January 2010.

Street said he wasn't very discerning when it came to deciding which souvenirs to purchase and take home.

"I picked out whatever I liked," he said.

Street, who admitted to not being a big collector of baseball memorabilia, even if it's his own, said he did bring back something for himself to commemorate his first All-Star Game.

"I got my [batting practice] jersey signed by the NL squad," he said. "And they send you a team ball as well."

Short hops

• Pitcher Eric Stults started a rehabilitation assignment on Thursday with Triple-A Tucson. Stults allowed three earned runs on three hits in 2 2/3 innings. "He got better as the game went on," San Diego manager Bud Black said. Stults threw 61 pitches and will start again on Tuesday. He will throw around 75 pitches or so as he continues to build arm strength. Stults landed on the disabled list on June 4 with a strained left lat muscle.

• Third baseman Jedd Gyorko, ranked by MLB.com as the Padres' No. 4 prospect, hit his 14th home run on Thursday for Triple-A Tucson. He has 50 RBIs in his first 50 games with the team following a promotion from Double-A San Antonio. All told, he has 20 home runs, 67 RBIs and a .313 average in 84 games this season.